Don’t Forget to Evaluate Possible Mental Disabilities

In applying for Social Security Disability or SSI benefits, attorneys and claimants generally focus on physical disabilities. These physical disabilities can include heart problems, back disorders, or respiratory problems.

Many times, possible mental disabilities are not considered. There can be many reasons that this failure to consider occurs. Claimants may not bring the mental symptoms up in applying or to the attorney’s attention. Claimants may be embarrassed or fail to acknowledge that they have a mental condition.

It is important to remember that mental disabilities can qualify a Claimant for Social Security Disability or SSI benefits just as physical disabilities can. Therefore, mental disabilities should not be ignored.

It is not unusual for persons with major physical disabilities to develop severe depression or anxiety. The Social Security Administration does not consider what caused the mental disability. The fact that the mental disability may have been caused by a physical disability does not matter.

If you are experiencing unusual symptoms such as anxiety, depression, sleeping problems, changes in eating, lack of energy, or isolation, you need to bring these symptoms to the attention of your attorney or Social Security worker.

 

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The Biggest Mistake Made by Social Security Claimants

 

One of the biggest mistakes that people make in applying for Social Security benefits is that they believe and assume that the Social Security Administration is their advocate. They believe that the Social Security Administration is advocating for them and taking care of their cases. The truth is that the Social Security Administration is a federal administrative body to administer claims. Don’t get me wrong. The people that work with the Social Security Administration are good hard-working people.

But the Social Security Administration is not the claimant’s attorney. Although the Social Security Administration will assist to some degree in getting medical evidence, it is the responsibility of the clamant to obtain and submit medical evidence. The Social Security Administration will not assist a person in advocating the claimant’s claims. Without an attorney, claimant’s find that they are representing themselves. They will find that their claims have been denied because evidence was not received or important parts of their cases were not submitted. To add insult to injury, it is difficult to appeal these decisions.

It is very important that a claimant consult with an experienced attorney that handles Social Security cases. A claimant’s case is important to them. The process in obtaining benefits is a long one and often times, the claimant is experiencing financial distress. Time is of the essence. So, it is important that claimant make the most of their opportunity to make sure that their cases are being properly presented.

Kent S. DeJean

 

When Can I Get My Full Social Security Retirement Benefits?

 

When you can obtain full retirement, benefits are determined by your date of birth. If you were born between 1943 and 1954, full retirement age is 66. Between 1955 and 1959, full retirement gradually climbs toward 67 if your birthday falls between 1955 and 1959. For those born in 1960 or later, full retirement age is 67. When you turn 62, you can apply for Social Security retirement benefits but, taking benefits before your full retirement age results in a reduction of as much as 25% of your benefit. Further, this reduction would be permanent. If you have any questions about Social Security, you should consult an experienced Social Security attorney. Kent S. DeJean

How Long Must I Be Disabled to Quality for Social Security Disability Benefits?

There are specific time periods on how long you are to be disabled before you can collect Social Security disability benefits. You may become eligible if one of the three-time periods are met:

  1. You have a disability that has lasted a year;

 

  1. You have a disability that is expected to last a year; or

 

  1. You have a disability that will result in death.

If you have any questions as to whether you may be eligible for Social Security disability benefits, you should consult and experienced Social Security disability attorney. Kent S. DeJean

Free Senior Talk

There will be a Free Senior talk given at the Wyndham Garden Hotel 5600 Bluebonnet Blvd. Wednesday, March 28, 2018 at 9:30am, 12:00 and 4:00pm.  Call 225-892-9702 to reserve your spot.

How Much Monthly Social Security Benefits Will I Get When I Retire Or Am Disabled?

There is a very good online article about how your monthly Social Security Benefits. The following is the article’s website:

http://finance.yahoo.com/news/how‑social‑security‑benefits‑are‑calculated‑173545005.html?soc_src=mail&soc_trk=ma

The Social Security Administration has a website where you can calculate your own benefits yourself. The following is the Social Security Administration’s website:http://www.socialsecurity.gov/myaccount/

If you have any questions, concerning Social Security benefits, you should consult an experienced Social Security attorney. Kent S. DeJean

Online Social Security Services

The Social Security Administration’s official website is located online at http://www.ssa.gov/

On this website, you can create an account to change your address and manage your Social Security benefits. You can also use this website to estimate your monthly retirement or disability benefits.

You can also use this website to apply for Social Security benefits and appeal a decision. This website will also let you know what benefits you may be eligible receive and information on obtaining a new or revised Social Security card.

This website can be very useful to potential claimants by avoiding have to spend the time, money and effort to go to a local Social Security office.

If you have any questions concerning Social Security disability benefits, you should consult with an experienced Social Security Disability attorney. Kent S. DeJean

My Application for Social Security Benefits Has Been Denied! What Do I Do?

Appeal as soon as possible! You should appeal your denial of benefits as soon as possible. For unfavorable decisions from the local office and the administrative law judge, you have only sixty (60) days to file an appeal.

If you don’t file an appeal within sixty (60) days, your decision will become final and you will not be able to appeal it. Your only other possible option will be to re-apply with the local office.

By not appealing, you could lose significant back payments for Social Security benefits.

You should also appeal right away because the appeal process already takes a long time before you will receive a decision. Every day, week and month that you delay is adding additional time to what is already a slow process.

Appeals sent by mail can be lost and misplaced. I recommend that clients hand deliver their appeal form to the Social Security office.  Make sure that the appeal form is stamped with a receipt date and make sure that you have them also stamp the receipt on your own copy. This way if the appeal is lost, you will have proof that you filed your appeal.

You do not have to have an attorney to appeal an unfavorable decision. However, I do recommend that should you obtain an unfavorable decision that you consult with an experienced Social Security attorney. Kent S. DeJean

 

When can a someone get Social Security spousal benefits based on the record of their spouse?

A person may be eligible for a monthly benefit up to one half (½) of their spouse’s retirement or Social Security disability amounts. This spousal benefit is subject to limitations as to the total amount that can be paid to an entire family

A person who is sixty-two (62) years or older may be eligible for spousal benefits if the other spouse is drawing a retirement or Social Security disability.

Further, a person who is any age, may be eligible for spousal benefits if that person is caring for a child if the other spouse is drawing a retirement or Social Security disability benefit. That child must be younger than sixteen (16) years of age or disabled and that child must be entitled to benefits on the other spouse’s record.

Kent DeJean