Social Security Disability: My Cousin Got It. Why Can’t I?

Persons that apply for Social Security benefits often become frustrated when they are denied. They are particularly frustrated when they feel that their relative or friends received benefits so easily while they themselves have been denied.

Persons should be careful to avoid comparing their cases to the cases of others.

  1. All cases are different! Every case has a unique set of facts and evidence.

Different claimants have different kinds and levels of disabilities.  It is almost impossible to attempt to compare one case to another.

  1. The decision makers are different! Different fact finders with the Social Security

Administration may view cases differently. They may have a different opinion on credibility or evidence submitted.

Rather than focusing on other cases, more time, money and effort should be utilized to develop and present your own case to the Social Security Administration.

If you have any questions concerning Social Security benefits, you should consult an experienced Social Security attorney. Kent S. DeJean

 

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Can I Get Veteran’s Disability and Social Security Disability Benefits at The Same Time?

Yes. You can get both Veteran’s Disability and Social Security Disability Benefits at the same time. They are separate and independent programs. Both have their own eligibility requirements. The receiving of either does not affect the eligibility of receiving the other benefit. So, it is strongly recommended that you apply for both. It is also important to apply for both since it can take a long time before decisions are made regarding your claims for either.

Divorce: Be Careful What You Ask for In Property Settlement with Your Spouse If You Are An SSI/Medicaid Recipient!!!!

If a spouse is receiving Social Security Income benefits and Medicaid, they should be extremely careful in settling and litigating their partition (division) of community property under Louisiana law. SSI and Medicaid are needs based programs. Generally, a recipient is only allowed one car, one house, furniture, clothing, and less than $ 2,000.00 in any other assets.

The assets that a spouse received from the division of community property may not be exempt assets for eligibility purposes. This can have serious consequences by rendering you ineligible for SSI and Medicaid benefits.

The SSI/ Medicaid recipient should make sure that:

  1. The assets they are receiving from a partition of community property are exempt assets for SSI and Medicaid eligibility purposes, or
  1. They must have a specific plan to immediate convert assets or spend down assets within the month that you receive the settlement to maintain your eligibility for SSI and Medicaid benefits.

If you are an SSI and/or Medicaid recipient that is involved in divorce litigation regarding division of property, you should consult a Medicaid planning attorney as soon as possible. Losavio & DeJean

 

 

Keep the Social Security Administration Updated and Informed

When a person begins receiving Social Security disability benefits, claimants may believe that they don’t need to do anything else. However, the Social Security Administration imposes duties on claimants to keep the Social Security Administration informed and updated on any changes which can affect a claimant’s eligibility for benefits. These changes include:

  1. Changes in work activity such as changes in hours, rate of pay, and jobs;
  1. Changes in your living arrangements such as other adults and children living in the household;
  1. Improvements in your medical or mental condition; and
  1. If you move out of the country.

Make sure that you keep a copy of any written correspondence notifying the Social Security Administration of these changes in case your notification is loss of misplaced.

Should you have any questions about Social Security disability benefits, contact an experienced Social Security disability attorney. Kent S. DeJean

Will an Inheritance or Personal Injury Settlement Effect My Social Security Benefits?

It is not unusual for person’s receiving Social Security benefits to come into money or property by way of inheritance or personal injury settlement or judgment. To determine whether the receipt of this money or property will adversely affect your benefits, you must determine what type of Social Security benefits you are receiving.

There are two types are Social Security benefits: Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits and the other is called Social Security Disability (SSDI) benefits.

Social Security Disability benefits are paid to persons that have put in the required number of quarter payments over a specified period of time and is not needs based. A person drawing Social Security Disability benefits has no limits on what property they can own.  Therefore, the receipt of an inheritance or personal injury settlement will have no effect on a person receiving Social Security Disability benefits.

On the other hand, Supplemental Security Income benefits is a needs-based program. Claimants are entitled to these benefits only if they do not exceed certain property limits.  Therefore, the receipt of an inheritance or personal injury settlement may have an effect on a person receiving Supplemental Security Income benefits.

If you are unsure what kind of benefits you are drawing, you can obtain this information the Social Security Administration in order to take preventive actions to avoid losing eligibility of your Supplemental Security Income benefits.

 

 

Important Upcoming Free Seminar

Our next free seminar on How to Plan for Long Term Care is scheduled for Tuesday August 21, 2018 at the Ascension Parish Library – Gonzales 708 South Irma Blvd. Gonzales, LA 70737 at 9:30am, 12:00pm, and 6:00pm.  To reserve your spot please call 877-868-8907

Beware! Homestead Exemption for Louisiana Bankruptcies Applies Only to A Single Person or Married Couple!

Debtors in Louisiana can be exempt from seizures in a Louisiana bankruptcy of equity in their home of $ 25,000.00. Further, if the obligations are related as a direct result of catastrophic or terminal illness or injury, the debtor can claim the full value of the home based on a value one year before seizure in bankruptcy.

It is important to remember that this exemption is available to a person individually or a married couple. However, the exemption is not available if the property is co-owned with another person that is not the spouse of the debtor. Therefore, a debtor could not claim the exemption if they own their property with a friend, girlfriend, boyfriend, relative or child.  This can have significant implications of causing a home to be seized by the trustee to provide the proceeds to creditors.

Therefore, persons that co-own their home with someone other than their spouse need to make sure that they disclose this fact to their attorney.

If you have any questions concerning bankruptcy, you should consult an experienced bankruptcy attorney.

 

Kent S. DeJean

 

 

 

The Difficulties of Challenging a Will

Due to the increased number of diagnosed cases of Alzheimer’s disease and dementia, there are more potential cases of heirs challenging wills based on the decedent’s incapacity. Challenging a will in Louisiana courts, can be expensive, time consuming and emotionally difficult. These types of cases can be difficult to win.

It is important to remember that under Louisiana law, there is a presumption that the decedent has capacity. The burden is on the person challenging the will to show that the decedent lacked legal capacity to execute at will at the time it was signed. If there is a tie, the person challenging the will lose.

Unless the decedent was an interdicted or an unemancipated minor at the time they executed the will, proving incapacity can be very difficult to prove. The strength of the decedent’s treating medical doctor can be critical and pivotal as to the outcome. Many times, doctors are unwilling or unable to give a strong opinion as to a lack of capacity.

Also, practical factors should be considered prior to filing a lawsuit such as the amount the person challenging the will is willing to spend on litigation as well as the amount that can potentially be won.

Should you have any questions about succession, you should consult with an experienced estate planning attorney.

Kent S. DeJean

Will an Inheritance or Personal Injury Settlement Effect My Social Security Benefits?

It is not unusual for person’s receiving Social Security benefits to come into money or property by way of inheritance or personal injury settlement or judgment. To determine whether the receipt of this money or property will adversely affect your benefits, you must determine what type of Social Security benefits you are receiving.

There are two types are Social Security benefits: Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits and the other is called Social Security Disability (SSDI) benefits.

Social Security Disability benefits are paid to persons that have put in the required number of quarter payments over a specified period of time and is not needs based. A person drawing Social Security Disability benefits has no limits on what property they can own.  Therefore, the receipt of an inheritance or personal injury settlement will have no effect on a person receiving Social Security Disability benefits.

On the other hand, Supplemental Security Income benefits is a needs-based program. Claimants are entitled to these benefits only if they do not exceed certain property limits.  Therefore, the receipt of an inheritance or personal injury settlement may affect a person receiving Supplemental Security Income benefits.

If you are unsure what kind of benefits you are drawing, you can obtain this information the Social Security Administration in order to take preventive actions to avoid losing eligibility of your Supplemental Security Income benefits.